Wednesday, June 18, 2014

HATTIE FROM #CHICAGO et.al. #trending ?




bmarshphd posted: " This photograph, by celebrated photographer Charles Eisenmann, exudes love. A young girl is pictured hugging her father and she exhibits a very loving expression. The father appears truly happy to be the recipient of such love. This photograph was taken"

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HAPPY FATHER'S DAY IN PLAINFIELD, NEW JERSEY ……. (PORTRAIT OF A LOVING FATHER AND DAUGHTER BY CELEBRATED PHOTOGRAPHER CHARLES EISENMANN)

by bmarshphd
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This photograph, by celebrated photographer Charles Eisenmann, exudes love. A young girl is pictured hugging her father and she exhibits a very loving expression. The father appears truly happy to be the recipient of such love. This photograph was taken by a famous photographer of the cabinet card era. Charles Eisenmann (1855-1927) was German born and was a celebrated cabinet card photographer during the 1880's and 1890's. His studio was located in New York City's Bowery District. This part of the city was populated by many people who were considered "on the fringe of society". The area was full of artists, transients, and prostitutes. The Bowery district appeared in the movie Gangs of New York (2002).  Eisenmann was noted for his photographs of human oddities (side show "freaks" and people with unusual birth defects). He was also known for his photographs of Circassian beauties. These women were reported to be escapees from Turkish harems but in fact were local women who were costumed to look wild and wore teased  "big" hairdos. Eisenmann also did celebrity portraits. His customers included P. T. Barnum, Major Tom Thumb, Mark Twain and Annie Oakley. He left his Bowery studio in 1898 and was succeeded by his intern/son-in-law Frank Wendt. For a few years he took portraits out of a studio he operated in Plainfield, New Jersey. The above photograph is a product of that studio. He later went to work for Dupont where he was the director of the photography department. A number of institutions have collections of Eisenmann's work. Syracuse University's library has a collection of more than 14,000 Eisenmann images.
bmarshphd | June 15, 2014 at 8:00 am | Tags: Charles Eisenmann, Plainfield | Categories: Photographer: Eisenmann | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-3zL
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bmarshphd posted: "   This photograph features an exhibit from America's first wax museum. Note how real the wax bride and groom appear in this exhibit. The groom is sitting in a decorative chair and wearing a pocket watch and corsage. The bride is wearing a we"

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PHOTOGRAPH OF WEDDING COUPLE EXHIBIT AT AMERICA'S FIRST WAX MUSEUM

by bmarshphd
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WHITEHEAD_0004
This photograph features an exhibit from America's first wax museum. Note how real the wax bride and groom appear in this exhibit. The groom is sitting in a decorative chair and wearing a pocket watch and corsage. The bride is wearing a wedding band, flowers, and a bridal veil. Her dark wedding dress is beaded and  intricately ornate. This wedding couple looks so real. In fact, they are real. They just look waxen. No offense is meant toward this couple. They are probably posing the way they photographer had instructed them. The photographic process was not generous to their appearance. Writing this description caused me to wonder when wax museums came into existence. Research quickly revealed that the first wax museum originated some time in the early 18th century. However, the creation and use of wax figures for ceremonies occurred many years before that. This cabinet card presents a mystery that I was unable to resolve despite spending quite a bit of time on the endeavor. The mystery involves identifying the photographer of this image. I have copied his studio stamp that was on the reverse of this cabinet card and it can be seen above. Any attempt by the Cabinet Card Gallery's vast unpaid research department (the gallery's visitors) to discover the photographers identity would be appreciated. I did not find the name of the photographer to be legible. It also didn't help that no town, city, or state was listed. For those up to the challenge, good luck in your search.
bmarshphd | June 14, 2014 at 11:42 am | Tags: bride, Groom, Wax Museum, Wedding | Categories: Wedding | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-3zm
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bmarshphd posted: "   A pretty corseted actress poses for this cabinet card portrait by theatrical photographer, J. B. Scholl, in Chicago, Illinois. The wasp waisted actress is posed a bit provocatively by the photographer. She has her hands on her hips and her"

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A PRETTY WASP WAISTED ACTRESS NAMED HATTIE IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS (HATTIE HARVEY: A MYSTERY AND A STORY OF INFATUATION)

by bmarshphd

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A pretty corseted actress poses for this cabinet card portrait by theatrical photographer, J. B. Scholl, in Chicago, Illinois. The wasp waisted actress is posed a bit provocatively by the photographer. She has her hands on her hips and her head is slightly tilted. She is also exhibiting a mischievous grin.The reverse of the image is inscribed and dated. The cabinet card is signed "For ever yours, Hattie". There is a possibility that her name is "Nattie" because the first letter of the name is not very legible. The back of the card is dated 1892. In addition to the State Street address, during his career, Scholl also had studios at two locations on South Halsted in Chicago. Perhaps a visitor to the cabinet card gallery can identify this actress. It is my opinion that this actress is Miss Hattie Harvey. The opinion is formulated by viewing other images of Miss Harvey and by her connection to Chicago. An article about Hattie Harvey appeared in the New York Times (1892). The article was entitled "Hattie Harvey's Infatuation". It seems the young Chicago actress had developed an infatuation for an Englishman in her company named Brooks (now we know why she has such a mischievous grin in this photograph). Her parents were not pleased and when the company's production closed, her father promised to arrange more engagements for the company if his daughter would give up Mr Brooks. She refused his manipulative offer and there were some "exciting scenes" that occurred in the Grand Hotel concerning this family conflict. In addition, Hattie's mother had two fainting spells "over the affair". The newspaper article described Harvey as a "very pretty girl of nineteen" and reported that she declared she would marry the fifty year-old Brooks. However, public speculation was that Brooks, who was recently divorced, still had another wife back in England. Hattie Harvey's parents threatened to "cast her off" if she continued the relationship with the"adventurer".
The second photograph produced by Newsboy (#379) as part of a series of tobacco premiums, is a portrait of  "Miss Infatuation", Hattie Harvey. Compare the photograph with the one above and decide whether the two women are one and the same. It is my view that the portraits both feature Miss Harvey. Please leave a comment if you have an opinion about this matter. In the second photograph, Miss Harvey appears to be in wardrobe for one of her stage appearances. She certainly was an attractive woman.
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bmarshphd posted: " The woman in this photograph does not want to compete with the sculpture alongside her so she adeptly covered the top of the piece with her hand. Perhaps its not the competition she feared but instead she wanted to protect the viewers of her portrait fr"

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PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN ART CRITIC IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA TERRITORY

by bmarshphd
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The woman in this photograph does not want to compete with the sculpture alongside her so she adeptly covered the top of the piece with her hand. Perhaps its not the competition she feared but instead she wanted to protect the viewers of her portrait from seeing the "bad art" beside her. Most likely the real reason why she's holding the statue is that she didn't know what else to do with her hand. This is where the photographer is supposed to play a role by posing his subject. However, Mr Hartwell seems to have been asleep at the camera and didn't notice the posing faux pas. Mr Hartwell operated his studio in Phoenix, Arizona. The city of Phoenix was no booming metropolis. It's population in 1880 was only 2,453. At the time of this photograph, Arizona was a US territory and would not become a state until 1912. The subject of this portrait is unidentified. She is dressed well and is wearing a wide bracelet. Her nice figure is likely accentuated by a corset. The photographer of this cabinet card, Frank A. Hartwell, became a US citizen in 1882 while living in Arizona. He formerly was a citizen of England. He is listed in the Phoenix City Directory (1903) as a photographer. He placed an advertisement for his studio in The Native American (1908). The Pacific Coast Photographer (1894) includes a human interest story pertaining to Mr. Hartwell. The article reports that upon the birth of  his daughter, Hartwell, thinking like the creative photographer that he was, decided to formulate a list of all the baby girls born on the same day as his daughter and gather them all together for a group photograph. Due to the absence of today's HIPA's privacy laws, his research produced a list of six baby girls. I do not know if Hartwell ever photographed these six infants, but I certainly would love to have that photograph, if it exists, to exhibit in the Cabinet Card Gallery.
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bmarshphd posted: "This cabinet card portrait captures a pretty young woman with a sweet smile. She is wearing a white dress and jewelry including a collar pin and earrings. Note the length of her long dark hair. The photograph was produced by the Bushby and Macurdy Studio "

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SWEET YOUNG WOMAN IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

by bmarshphd
SWEEYThis cabinet card portrait captures a pretty young woman with a sweet smile. She is wearing a white dress and jewelry including a collar pin and earrings. Note the length of her long dark hair. The photograph was produced by the Bushby and Macurdy Studio which was located in Boston, Massachusetts. To learn more about photographers Asa Bushby and George Macurdy and to view more of their photographs, click on the category "Photographer: Bushby & Macurdy".

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