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Saturday, August 31, 2013

Fwd: [New post] LITTLE GIRL AT THE GATE SOMEWHERE IN KANSAS



bmarshphd posted: "A cute little girl with a sweet smile pushes open the gate in this studio photograph by E. E. Van Epps. The child wears an expression that shows her excitement about obtaining a photographic portrait. This scalloped cabinet card was created in one of four"
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LITTLE GIRL AT THE GATE SOMEWHERE IN KANSAS

by bmarshphd

GIRL AT GATE_0009A cute little girl with a sweet smile pushes open the gate in this studio photograph by E. E. Van Epps. The child wears an expression that shows her excitement about obtaining a photographic portrait. This scalloped cabinet card was created in one of four studios operated by Van Epps in Kansas. The studios were located in the towns of Atwood, Colby, Hoxie and Sharon Springs.

bmarshphd | August 31, 2013 at 12:01 am | Tags: atwood, Colby, Hoxie, Kansas, Sharon Springs, Van Epps | Categories: Children | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-35Z

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Friday, August 30, 2013

Fwd: [New post] TWO SISTERS STARE AT THE CAMERA IN NEW CASTLE, PENNSYLVANIA




bmarshphd posted: "This cabinet card is not a terrific image. However, there is something about the subjects eyes that compensates for the photographs deficits. The teen sisters pictured in this photograph have lovely eyes. An inscription on the reverse of the image reveals"
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TWO SISTERS STARE AT THE CAMERA IN NEW CASTLE, PENNSYLVANIA

by bmarshphd

TEEN SISTERS_0005This cabinet card is not a terrific image. However, there is something about the subjects eyes that compensates for the photographs deficits. The teen sisters pictured in this photograph have lovely eyes. An inscription on the reverse of the image reveals that the older sister is sixteen years old while the younger girl is fourteen years old. The photograph was taken in 1893. The inscription does not identify the girls names. The photographer was the Gillespie studio in New Castle, Pennsylvania. In 1857 S. M.Gillepsie (1832-1906?) began his photography career as an apprentice to a photographer named Johnston in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1862 he opened his own gallery in New Castle. He was married to Henrietta Harper in 1859.

bmarshphd | August 24, 2013 at 2:26 pm | Tags: Henrietta Harper, New Castle, Pennsylvania, S. Gillespie | Categories: Children | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-395

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Fwd: [New post] PORTRAIT OF A WEDDING COUPLE IN FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS




bmarshphd posted: "This photograph features a not too comfortable wedding couple. Both subjects look frozen and the bride appears doll-like. She is pretty and displays a nice figure in her interesting wedding dress. She is wearing a crown of flowers while the groom has a fl"
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PORTRAIT OF A WEDDING COUPLE IN FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS

by bmarshphd

FALL RIVER COUPLE_0007This photograph features a not too comfortable wedding couple. Both subjects look frozen and the bride appears doll-like. She is pretty and displays a nice figure in her interesting wedding dress. She is wearing a crown of flowers while the groom has a flower pinned to his jacket. The photographer of this image is Thibault's Portrait Gallery in Fall River, Massachusetts. The studio was operated by Joseph Thibault. Written on the reverse of the photograph is the name "Joseph Mercier".  It is likely that the groom is Joseph Mercier. There were a number of men named Joseph Mercier living in Fall River around the time that this photograph was taken, making it impossible to garner information about the subject of this image. It does appear that the Mercier's living in the area were of French Canadian descent.

bmarshphd | August 25, 2013 at 12:05 pm | Tags: Fall River, Joseph Mercier, Joseph Thibault, Thibault | Categories: Couples, Wedding | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-38W

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Fwd: [New post] A WOMAN IN BLACK LOOKS VERY SERIOUS IN MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN



bmarshphd posted: "The Schiller studio in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, produced this photograph of a woman dressed in black sitting in a chair. Note her tulle wrapped hat. It appears that she is wearing mourning clothes. She is holding something (possibly a magazine) on her lap."
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A WOMAN IN BLACK LOOKS VERY SERIOUS IN MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

by bmarshphd

TULLE HAT LADY_0002The Schiller studio in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, produced this photograph of a woman dressed in black sitting in a chair. Note her tulle wrapped hat. It appears that she is wearing mourning clothes. She is holding something (possibly a magazine) on her lap.

bmarshphd | August 26, 2013 at 12:01 am | Tags: Milwaukee, Schiller | Categories: Women: Non Theatrical | URL: http://wp.me/pnHKU-38Q

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Fwd: [New post] COLONEL REUBEN STEERE AND WIFE (“THE SMALLEST MARRIED COUPLE IN THE WORLD”)




bmarshphd posted: " The subjects of this cabinet card portrait are Colonel Reuben Steere (1838-1915) and his wife, Rebecca (1853-1929).  Steere is elegantly dressed and has a walking stick. Rebecca has unusually long hair which is displayed prominently. Reuben Steere was"
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COLONEL REUBEN STEERE AND WIFE ("THE SMALLEST MARRIED COUPLE IN THE WORLD")

by bmarshphd

reuben steere

The subjects of this cabinet card portrait are Colonel Reuben Steere (1838-1915) and his wife, Rebecca (1853-1929).  Steere is elegantly dressed and has a walking stick. Rebecca has unusually long hair which is displayed prominently. Reuben Steere was a native of Chepachet, Rhode Island. He was 44 inches tall and 43 pounds at maturity. He was a member of the Lilliputian Opera Company. In 1880 he married fellow Lilliputian, Rebecca Ann Myers of Indiana. The couple settled in Chepachet in 1882 and Reuben worked as a truant officer while Rebecca operated a restaurant and confectionary shop. This photograph was produced at the "photo parlors" of Rieman & Company. The studio was located on Montgomery Street in San Francisco, California. The address printed on the front of the photograph notes that the parlors were "Opposite Lick House". What is Lick House? The name Lick House fosters all sort of silly images in my mind but the history of Lick House is actually quite interesting. James Lick was a renowned craftsman of wood products and a successful businessman. He began building Lick House in 1861. The building was two blocks long and three stories high. It was a luxurious showpiece hotel with 164 high quality rooms. It was considered one of San Francisco's premier hotels until it burned down to the ground during the 1906 earthquake and fire. Advertising print on the reverse of the photograph includes the following two slogans, "Rieman's Babies" and "When others fail, try Rieman". Additional advertising on the reverse of the image are the names George R. Rieman and Fred H. Pray. At one time, Rieman and Pray were partners in operating a photography studio. Writing on the the back of the photograph states the photograph captures "the smallest married couple in the world". To view other photographs by Rieman click on the category "Photographer: Rieman".

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Fwd: [New post] A WOMAN IN THE WOODS IN McPHERSON, KANSAS




bmarshphd posted: "This cabinet card features a well dressed woman dressed in black and holding a handkerchief. The woman appears to be dressed in mourning clothes. On the reverse of the cabinet card is the following pre printed quotation "Secure the shadow ere the substanc"
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A WOMAN IN THE WOODS IN McPHERSON, KANSAS

by bmarshphd

MRS VREELAND_0004This cabinet card features a well dressed woman dressed in black and holding a handkerchief. The woman appears to be dressed in mourning clothes. On the reverse of the cabinet card is the following pre printed quotation "Secure the shadow ere the substance fades". This quotation was commonly used in the photographic community in advertising to encourage people to photograph their deceased relatives to keep their memory alive. The next part of the "secure the shadow" quotation is "Let nature imitate what nature made". It was not uncommon to photograph corpses in life-like poses or in caskets, deathbeds, or other household furniture during the cabinet card era. See cabinet card gallery category "Memorial Card". This photograph seems to be more of a mourning card than a memorial card, though one can't be certain. The photographer of this image is Mrs. Vreeland who operated the "leading gallery" in McPherson, Kansas. To view other photographs by female photographers click on the category "Female Photographers". To view other photographs by Mrs. Vreeland, click on the category "Photographer: Vreeland".

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CORINNE: CHILD ACTRESS / SUBJECT OF SENSATIONAL CHILD ABUSE CASE





bmarshphd posted: " The actress pictured in this cabinet card is Corrine.  Corrine, like Elvis or Selena, was a performer that received national recognition and was known by just her first name. In this portrait by celebrity photographer B. J. Falk, Corrine looks to be t"
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CORINNE: FAMOUS CHILD ACTRESS AND SUBJECT OF A SENSATIONAL CHILD ABUSE CASE

by bmarshphd
CORRINE_0003
The actress pictured in this cabinet card is Corrine.  Corrine, like Elvis or Selena, was a performer that received national recognition and was known by just her first name. In this portrait by celebrity photographer B. J. Falk, Corrine looks to be teenager or young adult. She is dressed in theatrical costume. Corinne was the daughter of actress Jennie Kimball. Kimball acted in the theater between 1865 and 1873. The year of her retirement, she became the mother of Corinne, who the New York Times (1896) labelled "the most famous of all the child actresses of this country". It is not clear how Kimball and her husband came to raise Corinne, but is was speculated that she was adopted as an orphan. Kimball trained her young daughter for the stage. Corrine debuted in the theater at age two and a half.  At five years of age she played the part of  "Little Buttercup" in the Boston production of "Pinafore". She played the role more than one hundred times. At fifteen years of age she was traveling as head of her own theater company. Jennie Kimball doubled as Corinne's mother and manager. The New York Times (1896) reported that Corinne "was a goldmine" during her early days for Mrs. Kimball and remained a major money producer through the time the article was written. At the time the article appeared, Corinne was twenty-two years old.  Jennie Kimball's successful management of her daughter's career wasn't appreciated by all observers. The New York Times (1881) asserted that the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children objected to the way Corinne was being raised and successfully pursued custody of the child. During the custody hearing, eight year-old Corinne was put on the stand and interrogated by the society's lawyer. He asked her how many times she was photographed and she didn't know but said "she was never photographed in tights nor with her limbs and breast exposed". The lawyer's questioning revealed that the child had never attended school. However, Jennie Kimball did give her "lessons" each morning. The lawyer then gave Corinne an impromptu writing/spelling test during her testimony. The attorney also prompted the child to say she had never attended sunday school and didn't know what a bible was nor had she ever been taught anything about Jesus Christ. The society lawyer was initially able to convince the judge to remove the child from the custody of Mrs Kimball because she was "unlawfully exhibited and employed" in dancing, singing and acting on the theatrical stage. Mrs. Kimball was allowed to take her daughter for a brief period to change her clothing but was assigned an escort to insure that the child would be brought to the society. Mrs Kimball was advised by George Hackett, the manager of a Providence opera house that if she took her daughter from New York to Jersey City, New Jersey; the girl would be out of the courts jurisdiction and she could keep her daughter. Mrs. Kimball followed his suggestion, and allowed a man to spirit the child out of state. As a result, Mrs. Kimball was charged with abduction and she ended up back in court. After a short time, the judge considered all the testimony that he heard and decided to return Corinne to her parents (he called them guardians). He believed that they were loving toward the child and responsible enough to continue raising her. Interestingly, he had something to say about the religious angle pursued by the society lawyer. The judge wrote that the the US constitution protected Corinne's parents from being punished for not providing religious education to their daughter.  Corinne continued her acting career and eventually became involved in burlesque theater. The New York Times (1894) wrote "Corinne has grown up and proves a lively and entertaining performer. The article adds that "she has no large share of original talent, musical or dramatic, but she can sing and dance "well enough".
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Thursday, August 29, 2013

.@shesallwrite (Carla Riseman) has flicked her Bic!





 

Flickr®

Hi tqnewspix!

Shes.All.Write (Carla Riseman) has added you as a contact.
Make them a contact too?

Here are some of Shes.All.Write's recent uploads:

Peep4

Peep1

Master Chief 003

Master Chief 002

Master Chief 001

Peep4
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Master Chief...
Master Chief...
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If you don't know Shes.All.Write, she is probably a fan of your photostream or wants a bookmark so she can find you again. There is no obligation for you to reciprocate, unless you want to. :)




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